Repo Man Jobs and Career Description

Repo Man JobsAre you interested in researching Repo Man jobs? Repo man careers can be a viable way to find consistent work that always seems to be in need. Becoming a Repo man, or repo woman, will require that you follow certain recommendations. We have compiled some helpful information for you on your path.

What Does a Repo Man, or Repo Woman, do?

A Repo man, or repo woman’s, responsibility is to focus on recovering or repossessing property from one who has neglected to keep up with rent or lease payments. The repo agent is tasked with locating and procuring the property (could be something such as a boat, truck or car). The repo agent should be able to confidently determine that the item being picked up is the right one. The property should be procured and then transferred to a secure place. Cars might be driven away, though they are more often than not towed away; at times, the car will be broken into and taken away.

Clients

Repo men and women often work for several types of clients. The type of client that requires repossession of a vehicle is usually a financial institution such as a financial firm, credit union, or bank. Used car lots, car and truck dealerships and rental companies for vehicles are also on the list of repo clients.

Requirements and Considerations in Certain States

Repossessions that are Allowable

In some states, peaceful repossession is allowed. In many of these cases, the person recovering the property is required to be bonded (for property damage). Within several states, repossession is permitted only upon a letter of “right to cure” being sent to the debtor (from the lienholder).

Requirements for Repossession Redemption

Repo agents are mandated to work safely within redemption requirements of the state where they work. In most of the states, the debtor maintains the right to redeem the property by submitting complete payment of the owed amounts and reimbursing all expenses incurred by the creditor.

Liquidation Requirements for Repossession

Before liquidation of the property occurs, repo agents are mandated to adhere to state requirements for liquidation.

Licensing Requirements for Repossession

Only 13 states presently license repossession agents. Specific requirements vary among those states that require licensing. Examples include the following:

  • Maine Agents must be licensed at the level of debt collectors through the Maine Bureau of Consumer Protection.
  • Maryland Agents are mandated to hold a collection agency license via the Office of Commission of Financial Regulation.
  • Oregon Agents are considered collection agencies and register through the Department of Consumer and Business Services.
  • Michigan Agents are required to have a collection agency license and receive bonding through the Bureau of Consumer Services.
  • Mississippi Agents often are expected to maintain a business license in the district where they work.
  • Pennsylvania Agents require licensure via the Department of Banking and Securities.
  • Washington D.C. Agents are required to file a surety bond through the Colorado Attorney General.
  • Colorado and Hawaii Agents have mandated licensure “as a collection agency” with the Commerce and Consumer Affairs.

It is wise to check the individual state requirements to know exactly what your state will mandate. Make sure that you appropriately meet all stated requirements.